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Hello Irena, I hope you are well in this wet end of season. I have another question from Western MA. I am assembling some photos taken last summer and have this bright yellow "Goldenrod Crab Spider". The striking creature relies on Camouflage for it's protection and it's aggressive hunting technique. As the animal I photographed is obviously yellow on a white flower, so I reasoned it had just moved from goldenrod to yarrow. The problem arises when I set out to accurately identify the white flower -- and realize it's not yarrow! I think it might be Conium maculatum L. or poison-hemlock! The photo was taken on June 24th (a little early for Goldenrod) in a grassy wetland on my property. It's not yarrow, and I don't think it's Labrador-Tea. Can you positively identify the (possible) poison flower? (Sorry, no image of the stem... and I recall it wasn't as high as I would think hemlock grows (probably about 3-4 feet). Desperately seeking verification. Cheers, Salvy

Location: MA : Berkshire county: Savoy
Location:
Notes:
Submitted by: Salvatore Raciti
Date: 2018-6-24
Modified: Oct. 30, 2018, 1:30 a.m.

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Viburnum sp. or Sambucus canadensis (common elderberry)
Irena, I am grateful (as always) for your quick and focused response. Your initial comment ("...small *shrubby* sprout") says it all. The Elderberry blossoms do look very similar. However, the plant (and all of the Viburnums) have woody stems with variegated, pointy leafs (yes, shrubs)! I really can't recall the leaf in question beyond what you can see in the original photo, but I remember having to stoop to photograph. I apologize for the omission of leaves and stem -- what you can expect from a photographer seeking visual beauty and not plant identification. Savoy mountain is basically a rock. Everything drains here... all the time. My south facing land turns into wetland at some point and late June is a cacophony of bloom. And it's the 21st century... with an exceedingly wet summers and lots of CO2 in the atmosphere. At least we can conclude the plant in question is probably not poison hemlock! (Phew) Many thanks, Salvy
Salvatore Raciti
(Oct. 30, 2018, 1:30 a.m.)


Viburnum sp. or Sambucus canadensis (common elderberry)
Hello Salvy, Your plant was actually a small shrubby sprout that went into flowering. I hesitate between common elderberry (Sambucus canadensis) or some viburnum--one of those species that don't have enlarged sexless flowers along the perimeter of the flower cluster, such as arrowwood (V. dentatum), maple-leaf viburnum (V. acerifolium), wild raisin viburnum (V. cassinoides), or nannyberry (V. lentago). According to the date, elderberry is the one most probable, because it goes into bloom exactly at the end of June, while viburnums tend to flower in May, except for maple-leaf and arrowwood, which flower later, yet mostly in the first half of June. (Those non-native viburnums that now escape into the wild flower mostly in May.) If you recall it growing in a ditch or some other wet spot, this could confirm the elderberry ID. However, elderberries typically have a larger, denser, and flatter inflorescence and the leaves that could be seen in the background look more like viburnum leaves. You'll have to decide.
Irina
(Oct. 30, 2018, 1:30 a.m.)


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1538827815a.jpg

what wild flower is this

Location: Sharon,MA
Notes:
Submitted by: Karen
Date: 2018-10-06
Modified: Oct. 6, 2018, 12:09 p.m.

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Ageratina altissima (white snakeroot)
We agree with Doug
I and A
(Oct. 6, 2018, 12:09 p.m.)



Snakeroot?
Doug Roberson
(Oct. 6, 2018, 12:09 p.m.)


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1538346128a.jpg

Would you identify?

Location: Myles Standish State Forest
Notes:
Submitted by: Doug Roberson
Date: 2018-09-30
Modified: Sept. 30, 2018, 10:19 p.m.

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2] [3]

Answer:

Aureolaria pedicularia (fernleaf yellow false foxglove)
Doug, I hesitated between this ID and A. virginica, because your plant has entire (or nearly entire?) sepals. A. virginica would be an exciting find, because it is missing from our MSSF list (while A. pedicularia is rather common). Yet in A. virginica corolla would be glabrous, shiny, and in this plant it is clearly hairy. As there are no hybrids described between the two species, this must be just a small, depressed (depauperate) A. pedicularia.
Irina
(Sept. 30, 2018, 10:19 p.m.)


Aureolaria pedicularia (fernleaf yellow false foxglove)
Thank you Irina!
Doug
(Sept. 30, 2018, 10:19 p.m.)


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1536059645a.jpg

More photos from previous post...

Location: Easton
Notes: The site wasn't letting me load photos on my previous post, so these pics belong to that. This enormous monster was in a local park in Easton. Probably not native, but worth IDing because of it's sheer beauty.
Submitted by: neef
Date: 2018-09-04
Modified: Sept. 4, 2018, 11:13 a.m.

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Phellodendron amurense (Amur corktree)
That was my first guess believe it or not, but the bark was hard as a rock. I guess cork trees aren't always spongy to touch.
neef
(Sept. 4, 2018, 11:13 a.m.)


Phellodendron amurense (Amur corktree)
The one that has bark without the cork layer (not spongy) and leaves without cilia along margin must be Phellodendron sachalinense--Sakhalin corktree, which is sometimes not recognized and included with P. amurense in the broad sense. These are the two most common in cultivation, but there are more species: P. chinense, japonicum, etc.
Irina
(Sept. 4, 2018, 11:13 a.m.)


Phellodendron amurense (Amur corktree)
Tree proved to be invasive in our state.
Irina
(Sept. 4, 2018, 11:13 a.m.)


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1536024762a.jpg

Gigantic Park Tree

Location: Easton
Notes:
Submitted by: neef
Date: 2018-09-03
Modified: Sept. 4, 2018, 1:31 a.m.

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:


Having trouble uploading more images...
neef
(Sept. 4, 2018, 1:31 a.m.)


Phellodendron amurense (Amur corktree)
Invasive tree from East Asia (China, Russian Far East)
Irina
(Sept. 4, 2018, 1:31 a.m.)


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1535565205a.jpg

Is this Cyperus esculentus?

Location: Lower Coonamessett River Falmouth MA
Notes:
Submitted by: Douglas Roberson
Date: 2018-08-29
Modified: Aug. 29, 2018, 5:44 p.m.

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Cyperus strigosus (straw-colored flatsedge)
Doug, it looks more like C. strigosus to me, because it doesn't have rhizomes ending with tubers. The stem origin is obscured, but could be swollen, like in C. strigosus, and floral scales are long and narrow (they are up to 4.5 mm long in C. strigosus and only 2-3 mm in C. esculentus).
irina
(Aug. 29, 2018, 5:44 p.m.)


Cyperus strigosus (straw-colored flatsedge)
OK, thanks! Good to know.
Doug
(Aug. 29, 2018, 5:44 p.m.)


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1535554863a.jpg

Common Flower

Location: Cumberland Farms Fields
Notes: Drawing a blank on this one. I'm pretty sure I posted it before but I couldn't find it.
Submitted by: neef
Date: Early Summer 2018 (June?)
Modified: Aug. 29, 2018, 2:59 p.m.

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1]

Answer:

Potentilla recta (sulphur cinquefoil)
Got it. That's a new one for me. Thanx!
neef
(Aug. 29, 2018, 2:59 p.m.)


Potentilla recta (sulphur cinquefoil)
A non-native cinquefoil
Irina
(Aug. 29, 2018, 2:59 p.m.)


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1533122598a.jpg

Is this Purple chokeberry?

Location: 921 Long Pond Rd, Plymouth, MA
Notes: Early summer orange leaves, underside lighter color, but not hairy.
Submitted by: Lee Pulis
Date: 2018-08-01
Modified: Aug. 1, 2018, 11:16 a.m.

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Amelanchier canadensis (thicket shadbush, eastern serviceberry, juneberry)
Then perhaps Canada shadbush? I actually hesitated between the two.
Irina
(Aug. 1, 2018, 11:16 a.m.)


Betula lenta (sweet birch, cherry birch, black birch)
Hi Lee, I believe this is cherry birch. You can check by scratching a small twig: see if it has wintergreen smell. Also, many leaves (tho' not all!) of any birch would sit on short shoots in pairs. I think I see one such pair in the photo (those that show autumn color). An easy way to identify chokeberries (Aronia) is to look at the midrib on the UPPER leaf surface. A chokeberry would have very distinctive glands that look like tiny upright prickles all along the midrib. They are just big enough for us to see them without magnification.
Irina
(Aug. 1, 2018, 11:16 a.m.)


Betula lenta (sweet birch, cherry birch, black birch)
Did a bunch of scratching and sniffing, but alas, no wintergreen smell.
Lee
(Aug. 1, 2018, 11:16 a.m.)


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1532489757a.jpg

Native?

Location: Jaye St., Plymouth
Notes:
Coordinates: 41.9367, -70.7059
Submitted by: Sandy F
Date: 2018-07-24
Modified: July 25, 2018, 3:35 a.m.

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Trifolium arvense (rabbit-foot clover)
No, this isn't native, in fact, a rather aggressive alien.
Irina
(July 25, 2018, 3:35 a.m.)


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1532489483a.jpg

Native?

Location: Jaye St, Plymouth
Notes: About 5? tall
Coordinates: 41.9367, -70.7059
Submitted by: Sandy F
Date: 2018-07-24
Modified: July 25, 2018, 3:29 a.m.

All uploaded photos (scaled): [1] [2]

Answer:

Conyza canadensis (horseweed, hogweed)
This is a native weedy plant, whose more recent Latin name is Erigeron canadensis. It is going to become even taller than now, may grow twice as tall and leggy.
Irina
(July 25, 2018, 3:29 a.m.)


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